October 24, 2018

Daily Practices for Nurturing a Love for Literacy

Most of us, at one point or another, have felt the pressure to ensure our children don’t “fall behind” when it comes to learning to read. The truth is, the best way to prepare young children for reading is really quite simple:

  • Add rich language to a child’s day by narrating simple routines and interactions.
  • Read with children daily.
  • Read yourself! Give children the opportunity to see the adults in their lives read, too.

And, speaking of raising a reader, this Thursday, October 25th, is Read for the Record day!

As advocates for early childhood and early literacy, we’re excited to participate in the world’s largest shared reading experience once again this  year.

Jumpstart’s Read for the Record brings together millions of people each year in classrooms, libraries, community centers, and homes across the US. This annual campaign was launched over a decade ago to highlight the importance of building early literacy and language skills for EVERY child, so that all children have the opportunity to enter kindergarten prepared to succeed.

Maybe Something Beautiful book image

This year, along with millions of people from around the globe, our classrooms will read Maybe Something Beautiful by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell and illustrated by Rafael López. The book is based on the true story of the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, California. Maybe Something Beautiful reveals how art can inspire transformation—and how even the smallest artists can accomplish something big. We’re excited to pick up a paintbrush (and book!) and join the celebration!

When we come together as a community around a book, read by an adult who exudes excitement for reading, children’s impressions of books and reading are expanded. Keep an eye out on our social media pages this week — we’ll be posting photos from the event.

Want more about early literacy? Check out this resource we love from the NYTimes for tips and tricks on reading with children, beautifully broken down by age group.